At some point of time, either from our own expereince, or by listening to others’, we would have realized that expectations often lead to disappointments. The cause of the disappointment can be yourself or another person. One common solution most of us think of, and rather suggest, is that we should lower our expectations (or altogether avoid having any!) – easier said than done. For the latter case though, there seems to be a more practical solution.
It is natural that we expect something in return for whatever we do, be it at work-place, home, professional or personal relationships. Even if we are totally selfless and there are no tangible gains, the bare minimum we expect is personal satisfaction. Personal satisfaction of having done something right, or on time, or of value.
Often, we pass on instructions, without caring to justify them / highlight the value of the result. For the person at the receiving end, such a task is nothing more than monotonous – because it has no meaning attached to his needs. However, when one knows the value of the job at hand, it sets a target for personal satisfaction. The satisfaction of having achieved something of value.
So, the next time we actually expect something out of someone, let us also convey the value of doing it right. This not only sets clear expectations, but also reasons as to why he/she should be doing it – in turn setting the target for a sense of achievement. If we can make people feel the ‘need’ to do something, rather than just having to do something, its more than half the job done. The highest form of motivation is what comes from within – and what can drive it better than personal satisfaction?

At some point of time, either from our own expereince, or by listening to others’, we would have realized that expectations often lead to disappointments. The cause of the disappointment can be yourself or another person. One common solution most of us think of, and rather suggest, is that we should lower our expectations (or altogether avoid having any!) – easier said than done. For the latter case though, there seems to be a more practical solution.

It is natural that we expect something in return for whatever we do, be it at work-place, home, professional or personal relationships. Even if we are totally selfless and there are no tangible gains, the bare minimum we expect is personal satisfaction. Personal satisfaction of having done something right, or on time, or of value.

Often, we pass on instructions, without caring to justify them / highlight the value of the result. For the person at the receiving end, such a task is nothing more than monotonous – because it has no meaning attached to his needs. However, when one knows the value of the job at hand, it sets a target for personal satisfaction. The satisfaction of having achieved something of value.

So, the next time we actually expect something out of someone, let us also convey the value of doing it right. This not only sets clear expectations, but also reasons as to why he/she should be doing it – in turn setting the target for a sense of achievement. If we can make people feel the ‘need’ to do something, rather than just having to do something, its more than half the job done. The highest form of motivation is what comes from within – and what can drive it better than personal satisfaction? [tweetmeme source=”FlaringSparks” only_single=false]

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