Its amazing what kids teach us. Talk to a kid about the latest political crisis, the ramifications of the economic downturn, or for that matter, even about the most selling product of Master Foods or Cadbury. You should consider yourself lucky if the kid simply walks away. In most cases, before leaving that place, you’ll be graced with an innocent confused rude stare.
None of us would be interested in listening to things we dont need to understand, or things that matter the least to us. To get the kid interested, you should replace “most selling product of Master Foods” with “chocolate”. Not that it is interested now because you are gonna gift a box of chocolates, but because you are atleast talking something that it can relate to – something it values. Even as adults, we behave that way. We dont care much about things that we dont value. The same for almost everyone out there.
When a large multinational corporation started selling its baby food in Africa, it used the same label that was used in America: picture of a smiling baby. African consumers were horrified: In Africa, the labels generally depicted what was inside the container, since most people can’t read.
The point is that whenever we communicate, it is very important to keep the target audience in mind. For businesses, its customer-centric. For software, its user-centric. For orators, it should be audience-centric. Unless we say things that will get the audience excited, unless we make them understand how they stand to benefit, unless we make the audience relate to our content, there is every chance that the message could be taken in unexpectedly adverse ways. It does a world of good to understand your audience and make it easier for them to resonate with your message. Remember, to effectively communicate, you should be talking with the audience, rather than talking to the audience.

Its amazing what kids teach us. Talk to a kid about the latest political crisis, the ramifications of the economic downturn, or for that matter, even about the most selling product of Master Foods or Cadbury. You should consider yourself lucky if the kid simply walks away. In most cases, before leaving that place, you’ll be graced with an innocent confused rude stare.

None of us would be interested in listening to things we dont need to understand, or things that matter the least to us. To get the kid interested, you should replace “most selling product of Master Foods” with “chocolate”. Not that it is interested now because you are gonna gift a box of chocolates, but because you are atleast talking something that it can relate to – something it values. Even as adults, we behave that way. We dont care much about things that we dont value. The same for almost everyone out there.

When a large multinational corporation started selling its baby food in Africa, it used the same label that was used in America: picture of a smiling baby. African consumers were horrified: In Africa, the labels generally depicted what was inside the container, since most people can’t read. [more here]

The point is that whenever we communicate, it is very important to keep the target audience in mind. For businesses, its customer-centric. For software, its user-centric. For orators, it should be audience-centric. Unless we say things that will get the audience excited, unless we make them understand how they stand to benefit, unless we make the audience relate to our content, there is every chance that the message could be taken in unexpectedly adverse ways. It does a world of good to understand your audience and make it easier for them to resonate with your message. Remember, to communicate effectively, you should be talking with the audience, rather than talking to the audience. [tweetmeme source=”FlaringSparks” only_single=false]

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